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Prestwood IT Newsletter Mar 2011 Issue - Java Edition

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Each month on or after the 1st, and only once a month, we will send you content from up to 5 community groups. If you select this Java group, you'll receive the following content below mixed in with the other groups you elect to include.

Prestwood eMag
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  March 2011 - Java Edition Year 13 Issue 3  
From The Editor
Mike Prestwood

Happy New Year!  ...what?
This month we start sending our monthly eMag again! We skipped Jan/Feb while we revamped our newsletter approach to further support the separating of Prestwood IT (the business) from our online community for I.T. professionals. Now our eMag features content exclusively from our online community. Optionally, you can add our business content to your eMag but the content is turned off by default.



Expert guidance from working professionals!
IT Water-Cooler for Power-Users topic:
Stamp Out Spam
by Vicki Nelson

How to fight back against spam and reclaim your inbox. As you may know, the volume of spam messages sent across the Internet has reached epidemic levels. Some industry experts estimate that three out of every five e-mail messages that are sent today are spam. The spam epidemic is costing companies, professionals, and individual users considerable amounts of time, money, and resources.

What is spam, and what can I do about it? Spam is generally defined as an unsolicited mailing, usually sent to many recipients. Most spam is commercial advertising, often for dubious products, get-rich-quick schemes, or quasi-legal services. Spam costs the sender very little to send. Most of the costs are paid by the recipient or the carriers rather than the sender. Some effective methods for preventing your e-mail address from being captured, sold or abused by spammers in the full version of this article. Click the title to read more.


Role-Based Tech Talk topic:
Crash, Bomb, Hang, and Deadlock
by Scott Wehrly
This article explores and defines the following terms: crash, bomb, hang, deadlock, exception, fatal error, and blue screen of death.

Off Shoring topic:
Off-shoring: You CAN fight back!
by Wes Peterson

Are you fed up with calling a company and finding yourself speaking to somebody in a foreign country? 

I am, and I've just learned of an effective way to fight back, help return jobs to America, and keep them here.

The best part? We don't have to wait for government to do a thing.






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 Monthly Java Lesson
Tool Basics Topic:
Code Snippet of the Month

Java String Concatenation

In Java, you use either the String concatenation + operator or StringBulder class methods such as append. Since Java compilers frequently create intermediate objects when the + operator is used and don't when StringBuilder.append is used, the append method is faster than the + operator.

In general, use the convenience of a + operator when speed is not an issue. For example, when concatenating a small number of items and when code isn't executed very frequently. A decent rule of thumb is to use the + operator for general purpose programming and then optimize the + operator with StringBuilder.append as needed.

Simple + operator example:

System.out.println("Hello" + " " + "Mike.");

 

Using StringBuilder example:

StringBuilder myMsg = new StringBuilder();


myMsg.append("Hello ");
myMsg.append("Mike.");
 

System.out.println(myMsg);
Java Topic:
Resource Link of the Month: Eclipse

Eclipse (although it can be used for and has many other plugins for other languages) is a widely supported, open-source, free, IDE for creating Java applications; whether they be small one-off programs or enterprise wide systems.





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